Olena Khytrova
Olena Khytrova

The paradox of Ukrainian medicine is that despite having a host of medical facilities and hospital beds it still cannot fully satisfy the people’s need for quality health care.

Olena Khytrova
Olena Khytrova

Ukraine’s healthcare reform is one of the few that might be carried out by the end of 2017. The World Bank, World Health Organization and European Commission played a major role in this by providing financial and technical assistance as well as engaging national and international experts in working on the new legislation.

Tetyana Gavrysh
Tetyana Gavrysh

Ukrainian healthcare market is estimated at $4.9 billion, $2.4 of which are patients’ medical expenses. At the same time, 90% of medical services are provided by state and municipal clinics, which fail to deliver the necessary scale and quality of treatment.

Tetyana Gavrysh
Tetyana Gavrysh

Growing up, Tetyana Gavrysh wanted to be a doctor. But when the crucial time before her university years came, she opted to follow in the footsteps of her father and train to become a lawyer.

Olena Khytrova
Olena Khytrova

After the reform, Ukrainian healthcare market will adhere to the doctrines of “patients equal money”, “free choice of doctors”, “accessible and comprehensive medical treatment” and “higher efficiency”. We’ll see how those precepts are going to work in the new environment.

Sergey Silchenko
Sergey Silchenko

It’s no secret that Ukraine consumes from 3 to 3.5 times as much energy per 1$ GDP as the European Union. This means that under normal circumstances our economy can’t compete in open markets. That is why encouragement of energy efficiency has been top priority for the Ukrainian government these last two years.

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